Suprax Instructions for Use | 400mg Capsules, 100 & 200mg Tablets

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USES

  • SUPRAX® (cefixime) is a cephalosporin antibiotic, used in patients six months of age or older to treat urinary tract, ear, throat, upper respiratory or tonsil infections, as well chronic bronchitis and uncomplicated gonorrhea. This medication will not treat viral infections such as the cold or the flu. In order for this medication to work, it should be taken for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor.

IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT SUPRAX

DO NOT USE IF YOU

  • Are allergic to cefixime or to other cephalosporins.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

  • Stop using and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat, hives, or difficulty breathing.
What to Expect During and After Treatment
Adults

Taking SUPRAX®

When you are being treated with SUPRAX® it is very important that you take the right dose, at the right time, for the entire length of treatment prescribed.

SUPRAX® only has to be taken once a day. You don't have to worry about missing a dose in the middle of the day. This is especially helpful when you are finishing up the last of the prescription and have already returned to your normal activities.

It is very important to continue taking SUPRAX® as long as directed. Even if you feel you are already "back to normal," the infection could return if some bacteria are still present.


Protecting yourself and others


Infants and Children
 

Administering SUPRAX® Chewable Tablets

When your child is being treated with SUPRAX® it is very important that he or she receives the right dose, at the right time, for the entire length of treatment prescribed. SUPRAX® Chewable Tablets help make it easier, with once-a-day dosing, so there's no need to worry about missing a dose in the middle of the day. Fruit-flavored SUPRAX® Chewable Tablets also taste good, so most children won't mind when it's time for their antibiotic.

For older children, SUPRAX® Capsules may also be an option (for any indication other than an ear infection). The dosing of SUPRAX® is based on your child's weight and age. It is very important to continue giving SUPRAX® as long as directed. Even if your child is already "back to normal," the infection could return if some bacteria are still present.



Protecting family members from infection

Keep in mind that a contagious child may still be able to spread infection during the first few days of treatment.1,2,6

Your doctor or nurse will tell you when it is safe for your child to return to outside activities like school or daycare. In the meantime7:

  • Encourage all family members to wash their hands frequently with warm soapy water (a good habit at all times, but even more important when there is illness in the house).
  • Disinfect doorknobs, toys, and other surfaces that have been touched by a sick child.
  • Avoid letting a sick child play with other children.
  • Do not let a sick child share toys, food, cups, or eating utensils with other children.

 

Caring for your sick child

Being sick is no fun. While your child is feeling ill, you can help him or her feel a little better by

  • Soothing a sore throat with ice pops or warm liquids like soup6
  • Encouraging "quiet play" with activities that can be enjoyed away from other children7

1. Davis, CP. Is Strep Throat Contagious? MedicineNet. http://www.medicinenet.com/is_strep_throat_contagious/article.htm. Accessed August 28, 2017. 2. Davis, CP. Is Sore Throat (Pharyngitis) Contagious? MedicineNet. http://www.medicinenet.com/is_sore_throat_pharyngitis_contagious/article.htm. Accessed August 28, 2017 3. Stopping the Spread of Germs at Home, Work and School. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/stopgerms.htm. Accessed August 28, 2017. 4. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. What is bronchitis? https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/brnchi. Accessed August 28, 2017. 5. How can I prevent bladder infections? WebMD. http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-bladder-infections-prevention. Accessed August 28, 2017. 6. Tonsillitis. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia. https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001043.htm. Accessed January 5, 2017. 7. Griffin RM. When kids are sick: How to prevent germs from spreading. http://www.webmd.com/parenting/d2n-stopping-germs-12/stopping-germs. Accessed January 5, 2017.



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USES

  • SUPRAX® (cefixime) is a cephalosporin antibiotic, used in patients six months of age or older to treat urinary tract, ear, throat, upper respiratory or tonsil infections, as well chronic bronchitis and uncomplicated gonorrhea. This medication will not treat viral infections such as the cold or the flu. In order for this medication to work, it should be taken for the entire length of time prescribed by your doctor.

IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT SUPRAX


DO NOT USE IF YOU

  • Are allergic to cefixime or to other cephalosporins.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

  • Stop using and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat, hives, or difficulty breathing.
  • This medication may cause a severe intestinal condition (Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea) due to a resistant bacterium. Tell your doctor immediately if you develop persistent diarrhea, abdominal or stomach pain/cramping or blood/mucus in your stool.
  • Tell your doctor if you have a history of kidney disease.
  • Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist that you are using SUPRAX. Your blood clotting activity (prothrombin time) will need to be checked.
  • SUPRAX can cause unusual results with certain urine and blood tests. Tell your doctor who treats you that you are using this medication.
  • You should know that unnecessary use of antibiotics may increase the risk of developing antibiotic-resistant infections.
  • SUPRAX Chewable Tablets contain aspartame, a source of phenylalanine. Tablets of 100, 150, and 200 mg strength contain 3.3, 5, and 6.7 mg of phenylalanine, respectively.

SIDE EFFECTS

  • The most common side effects are diarrhea, nausea, loose stools, gases and dyspepsia (belly pain or discomfort).

ASK A DOCTOR BEFORE USE IF

  • You are taking the drug carbamazepine.
  • You are taking a blood thinner.
  • You are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding your baby. It is not known if this medication passes into breast milk and whether it may harm a nursing baby.

The risk information provided here is not complete. To learn more, talk about SUPRAX with your doctor or pharmacist. The FDA-approved product labeling can be found at www.supraxrx.com.


You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, call 1-800-FDA-1088, or call Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. at 1-800-399-2561.